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RRP Roseville Pitcher

Posted Sunday, March 05 by Brian

rrp pitcher.jpg I have a Yellow pitcher that has been in my family for I know over 50 years. It has on the bottom; R-R.P.Co. Roseville, O No 357/3. Can you tell me anything about it?

This pitcher was my Grandmothers and when I was a small girl, we would all gather at my grandparents home and make homemade ice cream. My Grandmother would always serve warm chocolate syrup in this pitcher. I am writing a small story about this for my children so that they will always know its importance to our family.
Any information you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you for your time.

Nancy



rrp mk2.jpgI should point out immediately that this is not the pitcher you own, but one I found on Ebay with the same numbers, only in white instead of yellow.

The size and shape should be the same as yours. The 357 likely refers to the shape and the 3 after it the size. The RRP on your pitcher stands for Robinson Ransbottom Pottery company in Roseville, Ohio. The Robinson Ransbottom Pottery Company was formed in 1920 from two other companies. They made primarily utilitarian pottery items like your pitcher. There were also mixing bowls, cookie jars and more. They were located in Roseville, OH.

Your pitcher, which is about 6 1/2" high was just the right size for syrup, cream or whatever. It was probably made for a long period of time, possibly the 20's, but almost certainly in the 1930's and 40's.

Because they were in Roseville, Ohio., some people believe it is the same as the Roseville Pottery Company. They were, in fact, two distinct companies. The Roseville Pottery Company is best known for their art pottery lines of decorative pieces. They are very collectible and sometimes very highly priced. They also made some utilitarian wares, but even those are usually much more decorative than RRP's. Beware of people who refer to RRP items as Roseville and bury the RRP part of the mark.

Your pitcher has great sentimental value, but alas, not great monetary value. The one pictured, which sold on Ebay, cost just over $12 including shipping. But your is still priceless.

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